Huawei going hard on foldable smartphone technology

According to DigiTimes, Huawei has partnered with BOE Technology, a screen manufacturer, to be the first manufacturer to offer a foldable smartphone.

The objective is clearly to take Samsung, whose famous Samsung X is slow to point the tip of his nose, speed. BOE started manufacturing its first flexible OLED screens last year. The company will have to produce 8-inch folding screens for Huawei and the little rumor that at least one other phone assembler is interested in its technology.

The Chinese manufacturer’s plans are therefore becoming clearer, and it would seem that its objective to market the first folding screen smartphone before the end of 2018 is on track to be achieved. If everything actually goes according to plan, Huawei will then be several months ahead of Samsung, since the Korean giant will just start mass production of its “Galaxy X,” only to market it in the summer. This will give the Chinese brand six months to attract and convert a clientele that has been weaned from real innovation for several months.

Huawei works with display manufacturer BOE on a foldable smartphone.

A new report from our Korean colleagues at ETNews says Huawei is actively working on the design of this foldable smartphone with Chinese screen manufacturer BOE. Depending on the source, the company even works in partnership with several brands on the creation of 4 different folding smartphones. According to the Chinese site mydrivers, the 4 actors in business with BOE are none other than Huawei, Samsung, LG, and Oppo. As we know, Samsung has been working for years on the Galaxy X, the brand’s first folding screen smartphone.

BOE will present a foldable smartphone prototype at SID Display Week, May 20-25 in Los Angeles. On its website, the company mentions a 5.99-inch folding smartphone model and a large-format version with a 7.56-inch screen. Both devices are equipped with flexible AMOLED screens “that can be folded, unfolded, rolled up” and “a fingerprint recognition system that works on any part of the screen.” According to ET News, Huawei is mainly interested in the large format model.

The latest news is that Huawei’s first folding smartphone will be unveiled in November 2018. It should thus toast the priority at Samsung’s Galaxy X, expected for MWC 2019. According to DJ Koh, the head of the Korean brand, the software part of the smartphone is not yet ready.

interconnected world

Cybersecurity: why connected objects are so vulnerable

Connected objects are growing all over the place, but cybersecurity is sometimes the poor relation of this growth, many experts deplore.

Next May, the European NIS directive will have to be transposed at a national level. It covers network and information system security, including standard rules for member countries on cybersecurity for digital service providers in the areas of the cloud, search engines, and online marketplaces.

Today, with the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT) the number of networks is multiplied. IoT affects all sectors of automotive, home automation, plant, energy, health, transport, etc. where data is critical! Account numbers, intellectual property, access codes to sensitive areas, etc. all sensitive business information such as private data and connected environments must now be protected against potential attacks.

The Internet is the necessary foundation for the exchange of information and data from intelligent devices. In the face of the massive volume of data transiting through it, the security of smart networks is a prerequisite for the proper functioning of the Internet of Things.

Better understand what IoT is

understanding internet of thingsIt took two things for the Internet of Things to become the phenomenon it is today. The first element is wireless communication, necessary for device mobility. The second element is resource-intensive computing power: small integrated circuits capable of driving a wide range of sensors by delivering both the processing power and the storage needed to collect and store the data. These trends have been driven by advances in networks, data centers and the cloud to transport and host data.

This technological convergence has made it possible to develop new capabilities to facilitate everyday life and manage environments (urban, professional, etc.) like never before. The growth of intelligent home monitoring systems is an excellent example of this, with a market of nearly $80 billion and discontinuous growth1. This teeming industry is accompanied by the problem of Big Data and its treatment.

Why is the IoT so insecure?

Faced with the market potential represented by the Internet of Things, players in the sector are continually innovating to remain competitive, favoring control of production costs to the detriment of the safety of their products. A real eldorado for hackers!

The latter have perfected their methods and are increasingly using the IoT as an entry point. Among the latest examples, the recent Mirai botnet used to launch massive denial of service (DDoS) attacks, is a good illustration. Hackers have used default passwords on security cameras and other home devices2 to gain administrator access control, penetrate systems3 and generate attacks.

Take the case of industrial control systems that monitor and monitor industrial processes in a multitude of industries: from automotive manufacturers to steel mills, vehicle fleets and utilities to food companies. They are also an essential target for cyber attackers as they can be managed virtually any process in a plant, including assembly, product transport, component mixing and many others. Once again, as these systems are Internet-based, they become potential targets for piracy.

All these IoT systems have in common the need for better integrated internal security integration and control. The increase in IoT equipment remains debatable, but there is no doubt a correlation since the increased presence of remotely accessible equipment increases the attack surface. Almost all of these devices can be exploited through identity theft or an attack taking advantage of the potential vulnerability of technology, or even in some cases of the human.

The expansion of the Internet of Things is a tremendous revolution, but as with any new trend or technology, it increases the need to be effective and vigilant in security, especially in securing networks.

hdmi 2.1

HDMI 2.1: En route to 10K

The HDMI Forum has released the official HDMI 2.1 specifications. The opportunity to see that the standard still has a bright future ahead of it.

differences of resolutions

HDMI 2.1 unveils itself and lets us see a significant increase in its capabilities. The HDMI Forum explained that it can support resolutions up to 10K (10 240 x 4320p)! It can also display 8K at 60 Hz or 4K at 120 Hz. The standard is of course compatible with the Dynamic HDR, which adapts the various parameters (such as contrast, brightness or colorimetry) of the watched videos live.

new cablesEven more impressive, it can handle a bandwidth of up to 48 Gb/s (in contrast to the 18 Gb/s of HDMI 2.0) thanks to an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable that you will need. The latter is itself capable of delivering video in 8K HDR, while protecting devices near electromagnetic interference.

The sound aspect is not to be outdone with the support of eARC, which makes it possible to take advantage of 3D Atmos/DTS: X audio formats. Finally, the VRR mode is aimed directly at gamers because it offers a variable refresh rate, which allows you to enjoy a better fluidity in game and reduce the lagoon. No wonder for people who already know Nvidia’s G-Sync technology.

Given the weak content of the resolutions mentioned above, you will have understood that it is a question of taking the lead here. But the democratization of the 4K is progressing. It is therefore understandable that the flagship standard for home audio-visuals must keep one (sacred) one step ahead.