interconnected world

Cybersecurity: why connected objects are so vulnerable

Connected objects are growing all over the place, but cybersecurity is sometimes the poor relation of this growth, many experts deplore.

Next May, the European NIS directive will have to be transposed at a national level. It covers network and information system security, including standard rules for member countries on cybersecurity for digital service providers in the areas of the cloud, search engines, and online marketplaces.

Today, with the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT) the number of networks is multiplied. IoT affects all sectors of automotive, home automation, plant, energy, health, transport, etc. where data is critical! Account numbers, intellectual property, access codes to sensitive areas, etc. all sensitive business information such as private data and connected environments must now be protected against potential attacks.

The Internet is the necessary foundation for the exchange of information and data from intelligent devices. In the face of the massive volume of data transiting through it, the security of smart networks is a prerequisite for the proper functioning of the Internet of Things.

Better understand what IoT is

understanding internet of thingsIt took two things for the Internet of Things to become the phenomenon it is today. The first element is wireless communication, necessary for device mobility. The second element is resource-intensive computing power: small integrated circuits capable of driving a wide range of sensors by delivering both the processing power and the storage needed to collect and store the data. These trends have been driven by advances in networks, data centers and the cloud to transport and host data.

This technological convergence has made it possible to develop new capabilities to facilitate everyday life and manage environments (urban, professional, etc.) like never before. The growth of intelligent home monitoring systems is an excellent example of this, with a market of nearly $80 billion and discontinuous growth1. This teeming industry is accompanied by the problem of Big Data and its treatment.

Why is the IoT so insecure?

Faced with the market potential represented by the Internet of Things, players in the sector are continually innovating to remain competitive, favoring control of production costs to the detriment of the safety of their products. A real eldorado for hackers!

The latter have perfected their methods and are increasingly using the IoT as an entry point. Among the latest examples, the recent Mirai botnet used to launch massive denial of service (DDoS) attacks, is a good illustration. Hackers have used default passwords on security cameras and other home devices2 to gain administrator access control, penetrate systems3 and generate attacks.

Take the case of industrial control systems that monitor and monitor industrial processes in a multitude of industries: from automotive manufacturers to steel mills, vehicle fleets and utilities to food companies. They are also an essential target for cyber attackers as they can be managed virtually any process in a plant, including assembly, product transport, component mixing and many others. Once again, as these systems are Internet-based, they become potential targets for piracy.

All these IoT systems have in common the need for better integrated internal security integration and control. The increase in IoT equipment remains debatable, but there is no doubt a correlation since the increased presence of remotely accessible equipment increases the attack surface. Almost all of these devices can be exploited through identity theft or an attack taking advantage of the potential vulnerability of technology, or even in some cases of the human.

The expansion of the Internet of Things is a tremendous revolution, but as with any new trend or technology, it increases the need to be effective and vigilant in security, especially in securing networks.